Monday, August 6, 2018

Douglass reminds us: Christians supported far worse than Trump

Frederick Douglass
     Everyone is ignorant of something — most things, when you consider the vast storehouse of knowledge on subjects from accounting to zoology.
     Some hide it better than others. But we can all improve, and it’s good to spend at least as much time re-filling your own leaky bucket of information as you do pointing with derision at the leaky buckets of others.
     For instance.
     The Democrats have, since the election of Donald Trump, been fluttering our hands to heaven in amazement over his strong support among the religious — 81 percent of evangelicals voted for Trump. Millions of Bible-toting Christians see Trump as faith in action. Causing left wing America to ask: how, how how anyone professing to follow the teachings of Jesus Christ could also support the thrice-married, pussy-grabbing, lie-telling, insult-hurling, petty, cruel, vain, un-repentant Donald Trump?
     Puhleeze.
     Let me meet that question with a question of my own:
     Have you any idea of what Christianity has tolerated in this country? Supporting Vladimir Putin’s puppet is a trifle compared to the enormous mechanism of horror that religion in America has enthusiastically endorsed, not for a few years, but for centuries.
     Ken Morris, great-great-great grandson of Frederick Douglass is speaking this week at the American Writers Museum, in conjunction with its show, “Frederick Douglass: Agitator” featuring words and personal artifacts of the great abolitionist.


To continue reading, click here.



7 comments:

  1. All true, but it would be fair to recognize that the abolitionist sentiment in Britain which resulted in the 1807 Act of Parliament declaring the slave trade illegal originated in churches, notably protestant and non-conformist sects such as the Quakers. Until they began highlighting its cruel and inhuman aspects, slavery was viewed favorably by the British public as a profitable, and therefore 'Godly,' enterprise.

    In America the abolition movement was also, to some extent, church based.

    Tom

    ReplyDelete
  2. Let's not forget that the Southern Baptist Convention came into existence because of its members' belief that slavery was the will of God.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It is possible Frederick Douglass was mistaken about what his master was really up to. Lacking specifics about the denomination his master joined, it could have been one of those Satan worshiping cults, as well documented in many Rob Zombie movies. This theory can also explain the behavior of Trump and his supporters.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very funny, Bernie. But hyper-Christians will take umbrage at Neil's "attack" on Christianity, despite the disclaimers, while your words, if seen by one of the faithful, will circulate on social media demonstrating how embattled true believers are in their quest for God's justice.

      john

      Delete
  4. Religion sometimes bad. Slavery always bad. Feeding Geese fresh store bought bread a waste. Pardon me for revisiting an old subject. Just came from Meijers, watched woman feeding geese and gulls. She goes back into the store to buy more fresh loaves and proceeds on her mission. I drove over and pointed out that she wasn't helping the geese as they will eat the grass, while that bread could feed people at a shelter and the leftovers would suffice for the gulls. She said she gives to food kitchens. I said those geese crap on my sidewalk and she was contributing to a nuisance, then wished her a nice day and resisted the temptation to run over her flock.

    ReplyDelete
  5. "At least two-thirds of our miseries spring from human stupidity, human malice and those great motivators and justifiers of malice and stupidity: idealism, dogmatism and proselytizing zeal on behalf of religious or political ideas."

    -Aldous Huxley

    ReplyDelete
  6. " It is always right to use a stigma to beat a dogma." William James

    Tom

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for your comment, which will be published at the discretion of the proprietor.