Saturday, July 5, 2014

Saturday Fun Activity: Where IS this?


     This struck me for several reasons, in the few seconds after the el car doors slid open.
     The colors, first of all: light steel blue tiles with a reddish orange trim. Quite smart, for public transit.
     And then the whimsical typeface on "LOOP," the odd little split between the "LO" and the "OP," almost rendering it into a different sort of word. There was something sweet about it. 
     And oddly, there is no stop called "LOOP" on the el—I know it's officially 'L', but that looks ugly to me. If "el" was good enough for Nelson Algren, it's good enough for me. The CTA is going with 'L' now, officially, but it also created Ventra cards and we'll see how long those last.  Better to stick with the old standards.
     Sorry, where was I? Ah yes, so there is no "LOOP" stop to the el. This signage, though whimsical and perhaps even helpful, in a rough kind of way, won't tell you what station this is.
     Where is it? Googling won't help you here—I checked. You'll have to have just noticed it, as I did, which means you have an eye for design, and thus might appreciate one of my super-rare blog posters, which I will send to the person who correctly identifies the line and station this is. Post your guesses in the comments section below. Good luck. 

14 comments:

  1. This looks like the Grand Red Line station.

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  2. The Chicago red line station

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  3. Transfer from Red Line to Blue Line station at Jackson?

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  4. Though the Red Line is getting warm.

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  6. State & Lake in the Red Line subway

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  7. Beat me to it! State & Lake, Red Line.

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  8. Chicago Avenue Red line L stop

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  9. Red line at State and Lake.
    I'd really love that poster,
    but send it to Jennifer if she wants it.

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  10. Dennis McClendonJuly 5, 2014 at 10:01 AM

    The CTA and its rapid transit company predecessors have used "L" consistently for 120 years now. For some reason, the various newspapers' stylebooks instead prescribe "el," the New York spelling.

    http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/2468.html

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    Replies
    1. You're right, and I KNEW that. Just slipped from mind...

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    2. Well, if anything could get me to switch from "el" to "L," it might just be learning that "el" is the New Yawk spelling! ; - )

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Thanks for commenting. As soon as I vet your remarks, they'll be posted, assuming they aren't, you know, mean and crazy.